What Are The Biggest Mistakes Made By Pro Tappers?

Two weeks ago I shared with you what a bunch of my favorite tappers think are the biggest mistakes made by beginner tappers. Now I have have some of their answers to, “What are the biggest mistakes made by pro tappers?”

Jade Barbee – emotionalengine.com

  • Not thinking they (or their clients) benefit from ongoing supervision and mentoring.
  • Sacrificing listening and being present (forgetting to reflect back a client’s exact words) to go hunting for core issues.
  • Not being thorough enough.

Ilana – positive-eft.com

  • Neglecting the 9 Gamut.
  • Tending to get a bit caught up in the story instead of trying to find the core issue.

Ann Ross – eftuk.net

  • Going into a client session with any kind of agenda.
  • Neglecting to take care of yourself as the EFT Practitioner.
  • Not having supervision or mentoring regularly.
  • Using only positive tapping. It is not permanent and hides the reality/truth for a client.
  • Remembering that your client is creative, resourceful and whole, no matter what it looks like on the surface.

Jondi Whitis – eft4results.com

  • Not continuing to grow in their learning, mentoring, and being complacent.

Carol Look – attractingabundance.com

  • I lead several mentoring groups for advanced tappers. They sometimes *also* make tapping too complicated, just like beginners. The client tells them the exact problem and target, yet they keep digging for something else that isn’t there.
  • Pro tappers sometimes forget to listen and really connect deeply to the client. They focus on the mechanics of EFT, which they’re great at, and miss the heart of the emotion.

Ange Finn – TapIntoYourself.com

  • I believe the biggest mistake pro tappers make is thinking that by using the technique, they’ll never get triggered in any area of life by anything again. We work on understanding that tapping is a tool to help keep being overwhelmed by emotions as infrequent as possible, and then to move through them without getting stuck if they do happen.

Ted Robinson – Tedrobinson.com

  • They tend to forget what the overall purpose is for using EFT in the first place. In my practice, I use EFT to eliminate all of the emotional issues that distract my clients from being Present. I found that once they were no longer upset, stressed, worried, sad, angry, etc., they then could be in the Present Moment naturally and easily. I find that most professionals are simply doing EFT on whatever is presented to them by their clients and they really need to discover the spiritual underpinning of being here in the first place and that is to be more Present.

Lindsay Kenny – ProEFT.com

  • This is touchy, but some people think because they have gotten results on themselves, they can start tapping with others…on just about anything. Most get in way over their heads. They are left to feel inadequate and the recipients are left believing that tapping doesn’t work.
  • Think that if you know the tapping points and how to do the opening set-up, then you’re a pro. There is SO much more to tapping than that. I’ve been doing it for almost 13 years and realize there more to learn every day.

Alina Frank – tapyourpower.net

  • The biggest mistakes I see in some EFT coaches is that they fail to do their own work. I’ve seen it so often that this reminds me to not fall into the same trap. I hire an EFT coach when I can’t find the core of my own issues and recommend that everyone should. You’ve heard the joke about a lawyer who represents himself? He has an idiot for a client. Some issues you can collapse on your own but some really do need the objective work of another person.

Colleen Flanagan – EmoRescue.com

  • They tap on the symptoms rather than consider the holistic body-mind-emotion connection which usually involves fear as the core issue.
  • They don’t address and clear all the aspects/layers of emotion as they don’t know how to find them.

Steve Wells – eftdownunder.com

  • Getting stuck on one approach or one way of using tapping.
  • Thinking that tapping is the only way to shift energy and emotions or that everyone needs this one approach.
  • The curse of expertise: Forgetting how strange tapping can seem to the newcomer and forgetting to pace people’s understanding.

Rod Sherwin – tap4health.com

  • Being too general and not testing the results.

Pamela Bruner – MakeYourSuccessEasy.com

  • Following a formula, not being willing to be creative and different.

What Are The Biggest Mistakes Made By Beginner Tappers?

I recently asked some of my favorite tappers “What are the biggest mistakes made by beginning tappers?” Below you will find their answers. When everyone answered they didn’t know what anyone else was saying. I found it very instructive to see the number of similar answers that were given by many people.

Jade Barbee – emotionalengine.com

  • Not getting hands-on practice in core skills like Movie Technique, Sneaking Up.
  • Not keeping a Personal Peace Journal. Going into session with an agenda.

Ilana – positive-eft.com

  • Thinking they can only tap if they do the whole sequence and doing it in the right order.
  • Not understanding the wisdom behind saying out loud the “negative” words and so they run too fast into the “positive” phrases.

Ann Ross – eftuk.net

  • Going into traumatic events that they are not qualified to handle on their own. Being more interested in results rather than safety.

Jondi Whitis – eft4results.com

  • Not looking closely enough to be specific, or failing to even understand what specific really is, no matter how much we say about this to them.
  • Not using the Personal Peace Procedure to generate a list of things that will continually move them forward.
  • Relying on scripts and looking for something else to add, instead of mastering the basic formula they’ve been given; mine is like this – if you forget everything else, just tap on A (the truth right now) + B (specific details and info) + C (self-acceptance) = D (relief & results).
  • Not being willing to sit in the discomfort for even a few minutes to discern what they’re really thinking or feeling, so they can tap on that.
  • Rushing to add in positives before cleaning out is done properly.

Carol Look – attractingabundance.com

  • Beginner tappers often don’t choose a clear target to work on. They choose a huge problem (low self-esteem) and therefore don’t aim the tapping at a specific emotion than can be eliminated.
  • Beginner tappers sometimes ignore the reminder phrase (repeating the problem while tapping on the sequence of points) so they end up being disengaged from the emotional connection to the tapping.
  • Beginner tappers sometimes think EFT has to be complicated! This causes them to spend too much time and effort on making the setup statement complicated, and they losing efficiency and effectiveness.

Ange Finn – TapIntoYourself.com

  • Beginner tappers usually get hung up on what to say. They think saying the right things is the key to success, vs the tapping itself. I usually tell them, “just say whatever your self-talk at that moment is.”
  • Beginner tappers sometimes forget to use their tapping, or only use it for what they first tried it out on; i.e., if they are using it for anxiety, they forget to use it when they have pain or anger.

Ted Robinson – Tedrobinson.com

  • The biggest mistake beginning tappers make is not using negative wording while they tap. This usually stops them from fully feeling the negative feeling or self-limiting belief and they don’t fully block their meridians. That means they don’t get the best results because there was no blockage in place to tap away with EFT. The best thing to do is fully feel the emotional pain, worry, stress, etc. and then tell your story about the issue while you tap all the points.

Lindsay Kenny – ProEFT.com

  • Being too general when tapping. Starting the set-up with “Even though I have low self-esteem” or “Even though I have this weight issue…” They don’t know, or haven’t identified what they are actually tapping on. It helps to identify the emotions around an issue and start by tapping on that.
    For instance, people often have a lot of guilt, shame or disappointment in themselves about weight issues, clutter, procrastination, etc. By isolating those emotions, you can put them all together, give them an intensity rating and tap them away at once. THEN, identify why you think you have your issue and tap away the cause of it. This is a simplified answer to a complex situation. Bottom line is, people often start tapping on issues way over their heads and are often tapping on the wrong thing.

Alina Frank – tapyourpower.net

  • Tapping on global versus specific issues/events. As a general rule of thumb tapping on “the time when” is going to collapse all sorts of challenges quicker.
  • Tapping on affirmative statements. Carl Jung was 100% spot on when he said, “What you resist persists.” Tapping on affirmative statements before you clear out the negative might feel good but it’s only temporary and will not ultimately solve the problem.
  • Tapping on physical symptoms instead of the underlying emotional core issues as in, “Even though I have this headache…” The headache in this case is merely the body’s response to what is happening emotionally and that’s what your tapping should focus on.

Sherrie Rice Smith – EFTUniverse.com

  • 1) Not being persistent enough to get all aspects of an issue.
  • 2) Feeling that they have to tap perfectly to get results, thus focusing on the physical mechanisms of EFT, rather than focusing on the feelings and emotions.
  • 3) Not getting specific enough. Tapping too globally.

Colleen Flanagan – EmoRescue.com

  • They tap on the symptoms, such as lower back pain, rather than the core issue, which is likely money-related fear.
  • They don’t get the SUDS level to zero, then the condition returns and they blame EFT for not “sticking” or being effective.

Steve Wells – eftdownunder.com

  • Promising too much and being too evangelical about tapping.
  • Focusing more on the technique than on the person, and not realizing the importance of rapport, and pacing.
  • Not understanding that some problems are more complex and will need persistence and some will need additional support.
  • Not doing enough tapping. Worrying about the words.

Rod Sherwin –

  • Being too general and not doing enough rounds.

Pamela Bruner – MakeYourSuccessEasy.com

  • 1) Thinking that they need the ‘right’ words.
  • 2) Giving up too soon.

Andy Hunt – practicalwellbeing.co.uk

  • 1) Not knowing where to start so not starting at all. If they were just to start tapping on any aspect of the situation that would start things moving.
  • 2) Getting hung up on the words. I think many people are afraid of getting it wrong although tapping is a hard thing to get wrong.
  • 3) Being afraid of negative thoughts or emotions. If you want to shoot a tiger you have to go towards it (with apologies to tiger lovers everywhere).
  • 4) Rushing to the positive before the negative has been taken care of. Trying to put sugar on shit in the hopes that the shit will go away.

Round up – What is one thing you wish your clients believed about healing process?

There is a wealth of information in the tapping community. From time to time I ask practitioners I respect their thoughts on tapping, healing, and their work. (I “round up” their opinions.) This happens about once a month. You can read past round-ups.

If you would like to check out my answer to this question (and more) you can download “Recovering Self: A Healing Manifesto“. (For free w/o having to sign up for anything.)

What is one thing you wish your clients believed about healing process?

That they are not victims of the process, but they are in charge of it. Once they understand that they are an integral part of the underlying process, they then start to use it more effectively and extricate themselves from being victims.
Ted Robinson

That sometimes it isn’t a straight progression and every bump on the healing journey isn’t a failure but more knowledge and insight about the problem.
Alina Frank

I believe that any belief that doesn’t serve you can be changed. If I could get my clients (and the world) to believe that, I would be content with that as my life’s work.
Pamela Bruner

You are designed as a divine being that has the ability to constantly renew themselves. Just like a wound on your skin, this is the regenerative process that occurs naturally, you want it or not.

Emotional wounds will not heal if they are not allowed to through remembrance of these with resentment, anger, fear and hate. If you inundate your soul with Love and forgiveness you will heal. Remember an emotion is not a fact,.. you can let it go.
Till Schilling

Don’t judge the shift by the drama!

For whatever reason, some clients believe that they need a massive cathartic experience with lots of drama to change and heal. Yet, in the hands of a skilled practitioner, healing can be gentle, subtle and complete.
Rod Sherwin

That is worth taking time of your busy day to spend on healing. Even if you don’t feel like it (or should I say ESPECIALLY when you don’t feel like it). The longer you put it off, the longer you will feel unhealthy, unhappy or unfulfilled and there is absolutely no need for you to feel these negative emotions – you can heal. But none of the techniques will work unless you do them (or have sessions with a practitioner).
Mel

I wish they believed that it can be fun. It doesn’t have to be deadly serious and earnestly heartfelt all the time. Humor is so healing in itself, and to mix it into any healing process is a total blessing. I have found that it really speeds things up. It goes against the common belief that unless the healing is a struggle, it’s not worth much. I wished they believed that the healing process can feel good — because it most definitely can.
Janet Hilts

How would you answer this questions? Let us know!

Round Up – What is one thing you wish your clients believed about themselves?

There is a wealth of information in the tapping community. From time to time I ask practitioners I respect their thoughts on tapping, healing, and their work. (I “round up” their opinions.) This happens about once a month. You can read past round-ups.

If you would like to check out my answer to this question (and more) you can download “Recovering Self: A Healing Manifesto“. (For free w/o having to sign up for anything.)

What is one thing you wish your clients believed about themselves?

That they are perfect the way they are. They are beings of light and love who have created their universe. Some of the things they created they have outgrown and so they no longer like creations. But that does not mean that they are broken. All it means is they have to put their attention on creating what they want their life to be like.
Chip Engelmann

That they are worthy. I get a lot of clients that come to me with a particular issue like wanting to go for a new career etc but it soon becomes apparent that they do not feel worthy of the things they desire (new career, love, happiness).
Mel

“I wish they would accept that they are the “story tellers” of their life and they establish the illusions and then place themselves into each story perfectly to learn a new lesson each time. If they could accept that, they could then tell different stories and learn different lessons which I believe would be more beneficial for them.”
Ted Robinson

That persistence is sometimes the key.
Alina Frank

One thing I wish they believed is that it’s OK to ask for help or use EFT yourself as a first resort instead of the last resort. I wish they believed that bucking up is being unnecessarily hard on themselves. In our culture, suffering is highly overrated!
Janet Hilts

That they understand the amazing resiliency of the human spirit. Having worked with hundreds of clients who have managed to function in daily life when they have experienced horrendous tragedy just blows me away – and I’m humbled to be able to help them experience emotional freedom from their past as a gift of the courage and strength they have already demonstrated.
Rod Sherwin

How would you answer this questions? Let us know!

Round Up – If you were to start your own healing journey over again what would you do differently?

There is a wealth of information in the tapping community. From time to time I ask practitioners I respect their thoughts on tapping, healing, and their work. (I “round up” their opinions.) This happens about once a month. You can read past round-ups.

If you would like to check out my answer to this question (and more) you can download “Recovering Self: A Healing Manifesto“. (For free w/o having to sign up for anything.)

If you were to start your own healing journey over again what would you do differently?

I would have liked to reach the understanding that lack of money is a symptom of something else sooner rather than later. I spent a lot of time and money trying to make more money when instead it would have been to understand what money meant to me and what the lack of it was protecting me from.
Rod Sherwin

“I’d start much earlier. My journey started because I became very ill and couldn’t breathe. To this day, it has never been successfully diagnosed, however, I have come to believe it’s emotionally based.

Thankfully, it led me into a spiritual journey that is ongoing to this day. It is that spiritual journey that changed my life dramatically and profoundly. I now use what I’ve learned over two decades to help others in their healing journey and it seems to work quite well.”
Ted Robinson

Not a thing, I’m content with the process.
Pamela Bruner

All the steps I took were necessary. I’m not sure there could have been a better way. I can say that many times during this process, I might have disagreed with that statement.
Chip Engelmann

Get help! I did it all alone, but it wasn’t until I became a qualified practitioner that I realized it is better to work with someone else for the big stuff. For example don’t try to sort out your phobia or a past trauma alone. It’s not worth it, you could bite off more than you can chew AND it will probably take months for you do to it alone when it could be sorted in a couple of sessions by a qualified practitioner.

Mel

NOTHING…I had to bite the dust of my own pride and prejudice before I could see the path that I am on right now. I do not think that it would have been possible any other way. I would not change a thing.
Till Schilling

How would you answer this questions? Let us know!

Pod #49: Being Full Present In The Moment w/ Ted Robinson

One of the biggest challenges of the modern world is being fully present in the moment. Our attention seems constantly to be pulled in a million directions between the media we consume (even if it is just constantly chattering in the background), our loved ones, all the tasks that need to be done during the day, and everything we would like to achieve for our own growth. Being present in this moment is very challenging. In this interview with Ted Robinson we talk about how being present in the moment can benefit us and how we can use tapping to help us to achieve this state.

Ted Robinson

Guest: Ted Robinson

About Ted: Ted is a criminal defense lawyer and the director of the Center For Inner Healing on Long Island in NY. He is the author of a number of books, faculty for the National Guild of Hypnotists, and regularly works with clients one-on-one. Ted is also the host of a weekly TV show which is devoted to helping people be present in the current moment.

Contact: web @ centerforinnerhealing.com/; e-mail @ ted@centerforinnerhealing.com; phone @ (516) 248-5346

Links from this episode:

Play
Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes

Round up – What lessons have you learned about healing from a client?

There is a wealth of information in the tapping community. From time to time I ask practitioners I respect their thoughts on tapping, healing, and their work. (I “round up” their opinions.) This happens about once a month. You can read past round-ups.

If you would like to check out my answer to this question (and more) you can download “Recovering Self: A Healing Manifesto“. (For free w/o having to sign up for anything.)

What lessons have you learned about healing from a client?

Especially when using Emotional Freedom Technique, I have learned that the real issue isn’t always what the conscious mind thinks it is. A client will often present themselves in my office and tell me all about “their issue” only to later discover that its really something quite different than what they thought. I have come to realize that the conscious mind often has little idea of what’s going on within the subconscious mind, which is where the actual issues reside.
Ted Robinson

I learn lessons from my clients all the time. The best ones are about new ways of seeing things. When I hear what their limiting beliefs are, it gives me new insight into helping others. The most important thing that I’ve learned from working with clients over and over is not to judge where we start, just to go with it. This for me is the core of energy work.
Pamela Bruner

Over the years I have had a few clients that completed the healing process only after I suggested they acknowledge that I am not their “healer”. They had gotten to a plateau and only after we worked on their ability to recognize that it was their own bodies that were doing the healing did they finish the process. The part of EFT that is so empowering is that much can be done on one’s own.
Alina Frank

I have learnt that rapport is key. When a client feels accepted and connected for who they are, great healing occurs.
Tania A Prince

I’ve learned much from working with EFT with children with cancer. Mostly how one can shift anything, from fear of needles to intense unsupportable pain, in a short period of time. That much laughter is involved in our sessions that makes the whole process more fun. For me, the time to suffer is over and that healing can be and is fun.

What I wasn’t expecting to learn, but these children taught me, is that sometimes the healing takes place but the body does not follow suit and get better. In fact, these children passed on, but with such a deep sense of love, joy and peace in their hearts. That was the healing. The children reaffirmed that life is in the moment and it is to be savored. Love yourself, others and life now.
Deborah D Miller

I’ve learned so many lessons from clients. A big one I’ve learned from many clients is that we can never predict the far-reaching good consequences of healing one issue. I worked with a 62-year-old who was almost illiterate, clearing the shame and anxiety that had blocked her from learning despite repeated attempts through the years. I got a call from her saying, “I feel like a grown-up for the first time in my life. Do you know how good that feels? I never realized that I had always felt like a little kid because I couldn’t read.” She said she trusts her judgment much more now because she feels like an adult. What a gift! And nobody could have predicted that outcome from working on inability to read.
Janet Hilts

Sometimes you need the courage to cry: I had been working with a client who had suffered emotional abuse from an OCD parent through all their schooling years. Everyday they would put on a brave face to cope with school and the scorn and judgment of teachers and students.

After a number of tapping session, the control required to get through each day was slipping but the old habit of holding on to the mask was still strong. Eventually, as we tapped on the fear of letting go and the courage it had taken to survive all those years the release of tension and shame resulted in a much-needed release of tears and stress from their whole body.

It takes great courage to let go and cry and we can help ourselves and others the courage required to do so within themselves.
Rod Sherwin

I used to think that anybody that said they wanted to heal would benefit from energy healing, but to heal, you must really be ready.

I’ve helped people who are skeptics or reluctant to use energy healing, but it doesn’t matter, they didn’t have to believe in the energy healing they just needed to be ready and willing to heal and I have helped them to heal and move on (often making rapid transformations in their lives). I’ve also helped others who believe it will work BUT it doesn’t work for them, because they are not ready. You can’t truly heal unless you are ready to let go – that is the one thing that is non-negotiable.
Mel

Perseverance.

A client comes to me after about a years worth of running from one doctor to another seeking relief for his Tinnitus. Researching on the Web he finds EFT and applies it immediately. Partial relief is obtained, but still no end of his Tinnitus in sight. So he digs deeper and finds out more about EFT on his own. After 4 months and no additional relief, he decided to consult a practitioner.

After 2 EFT sessions his Tinnitus has disappeared, the emotional link to his Mothers death via an accident where hindsight always is 20/20 is realized and a deep sigh brings relief of his Tinnitus.

What was admirable, was that this was a humble man from the countryside with barely an 7th grade education and scarce means to afford a practitioner. His desire to get rig of his Tinnitus made him go the distance and learn the basics about tapping for many other issues now as well.
Till Schilling

How would you answer this questions? Let us know!